Cheesy musings, Profiles

National Goat Cheese Month: I have a Lemon Fetish

Quick question: Do you think there are too many special “days”? E.g., National Nutella Day; National Lasagne Day; National Apple Turnover Day. I used to compile a gallery listing all of the food days in a given month at my day job, but stopped when I realized it was more work than ROI, although I’d be lying if I said a little part of it hadn’t lost its lustre when I realized there’s a “day” every damn day. Exhibit A: Today is National Lemonade Day (and my sister’s birthday – National Kaleigh Bee-day). Tomorrow is National Spumoni Day and National ~Brazilian Blowout Day~. Oooer.

Lemon Fetish cheese

That said, I can absolutely get on board with any of the cheese-themed occasions, and this month happens to be one: National Goat Cheese Month. For me, it’s an excuse to discuss the morsel I picked up from The Great Canadian Cheese Festival in June: Lemon Fetish by Fifth Town Artisan Cheese Co.

It’s a goat’s milk feta, which is an interesting flavour combination as it’s less sweet and creamy than your more-commonly-found fresh goat cheese. It’s crumbly, dry and somewhere between less-salty-than-feta and more-salty-than-fresh. But the highlight, as the name suggests, is the lemon.

Lemon Fetish cheese

It’s made with lemon zest and you can tell at first taste. Right after the initial saltiness, you’re hit by a wave of the sweet citrus flavour that only comes from lemon zest. There’s a slight tang of herbs and spices that I couldn’t place at first; Fifth Town informs me that it’s also laced with red fife flour. Makes sense.

One of my favourite easy dishes is sweet potato with herbed goat cheese and a splash of maple syrup in its belly button, like a spud on spring break. I subbed Lemon Fetish for my usual herbed cheese and it worked beautifully. I also used it in a fresh kale salad with lemon-honey-mustard dressing. But my favourite way to eat it was off a (butter, safety first) knife with nothing at all. Now that’s what they should be selling at lemonade stands.

Lemon Fetish cheese

“I wish I spoke whale!” I also wish that whales had Lemon Fetish on deck to distribute via blowhole to the masses.

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Profiles

A long-overdue indulgence: Grey Owl

Grey Owl needs no introduction, as one of the celebrated Canadian cheeses lauded in the same breath as Louis D’Or or Bleu Bénédictin. But I’ll introduce it anyway with a taste of its cult following.

The last time I saw Grey Owl, it was at one of my favourite cheese counters, at Algoma Orchards. Rather, I encountered a lack of it. The woman ahead of me had ordered an entire wheel of Grey Owl, but there was a mix-up and it had been sold accidentally. She was distraught (seriously). If that weren’t proof enough of Grey Owl’s hold, the fact that the entire wheel sold in a few days is. I felt for the woman, but at the time I hadn’t yet tried it, so I couldn’t fully understand. Now I get it.

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I bought the teensiest, cutest little wheel at The Great Canadian Cheese Festival and saved it perilously close to its expiration; a blessing in disguise because then I had to eat the entire thing in one sitting without guilt.

I’m not sure how I avoided Grey Owl for so long, given its storied rep, but it’ll be on my rotation now, and definitely my next cheese board. Aside from Le Cendrillon, another revered Canadian cheese similar in flavour and construction (which, if pressed, I prefer of the two but let’s not divert limelight), there isn’t anything like it in Canada, especially in light of its different texture.

As mentioned, I let the clock tick on my Grey Owl, so the flavours were even more ripe and the texture quickly evolved. When I sampled it at The Great Canadian Cheese Festival, Grey Owl was pasty, as it is often described. But let it age and sit a bit at room temperature, as I did, and it’s a near-liquid indulgence at the centre. Exhibit A:

Grey-Owl-2

My first proper taste, at long last, was much more sour than I expected in the way that younger goat cheese is if you hold it on your tongue for long enough. Like a strong buttermilk that’s an almost a puckering punch in the mouth, offset by creaminess.

I preferred its ashy rind when it had a whole shelf life ahead of it at the TGCCF; it was still great when I had it at home but its pungent mouldiness interfered a bit with the more subtle centre. I wanted more of the sour, grassy butteriness that dominated my balanced bites, but was knocked over by the spicy, bitter aftertaste of the rind.

Don’t get it twisted: if you see Grey Owl, eat it. Fast. Before someone else does (see: aforementioned wheel sold right from under a loving devotee). But if you’re serving it to friends, I wouldn’t let it sit for too long so everyone becomes friends at its peak texture.

And for the sake of all that is holy (Mimolette, amen), serve it with honeycomb. As Nike once wrote on the question of whether to pair cheese with honeycomb: “Just do it.”

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Profiles

Fromage Friday: Laliberté by Fromagerie du Presbytère

Laliberté, like a lot of champions, breaks the mould. Pun intended, as per usual on Cheese the Day.

The bloomy rind cheese was crowned the Grand Champion of this year’s Canadian Cheese Grand Prix back in April. I scored myself a wedge at the Great Canadian Cheese Festival, and it was the first of my haul I dug into.

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It smells like any other slightly-stinky soft cheese – I think smell has a lot to answer for in turning people off more pungent soft cheeses and blue cheese, but that’s part of the deal, I guess – but one morsel, and it becomes clear why it’s a favourite.

It’s backwards in the best sense.

Immediately at first taste, you get a hit of mushrooms like you’ve been smacked by an oyster mushroom with a grudge. That’s closely followed by strong sidekicks of herbs and hay, and pungent vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower. But the flavour isn’t mouldy.

Laliberte-side-CU

Then, when you’re expecting it to become bitter, like any other strong, soft cheese in its position would be, it goes easy on you.

It becomes milky, creamy and light. The texture dissolves like cream masquerading as cotton candy. You don’t want to chew it, or even interfere too much with what happens when you let it sit on your tongue. It’s even better when slightly cooler than room temperature, so it doesn’t disappear too quickly and its creaminess stands out.

There is no aftertaste that comes to collect; just something reminiscent of cheese curds, mixed with surprise. The only bitterness comes from its rind.

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Usually, the flavours are in reverse for strong soft cheeses. A shy, delicate beginning, followed by a bit of brash bitterness. Perhaps because it’s a cream-added bloomy rind, the milkiness carries more weight – I’m not sure how that works. But it’s something to witness. I’d bet even non-cheese-nerds would appreciate the surprising turn of events that it has to offer in terms of flavour.

Honeycomb is usually a reliable wingman for any cheese, and it does its due diligence here, but I found it too sweet, really, for Laliberté. It deserves to partner with something that makes it truly sing, which in this case, is baked baguette rounds with olive oil and herbs – it becomes butter in its’ nonexistent hands, kinda like you by the end of your bite.

Laliberte-side-M

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Cheesy musings, Flavour of the month

The Great Canadian Cheese Festival at a glance

If there is a better way to spend a Saturday in June than sampling cheeses and libations from across the country against the backdrop of Prince Edward County, I haven’t found it yet. I only wish the Great Canadian Cheese Festival was a monthly occurrence.

My boyfriend gamely drove us up for the day (it’s about a 2 1/2 hour drive from Toronto) and it was well worth it. We were able to make it through all of the booths in an afternoon, but next year I’d like to go for the weekend to enjoy the events and demonstrations. And really, to ride out the blissful atmosphere for a second day.

Seeing and chatting with so many cheesemongers and cheese nerds like myself – and obviously, sampling to my heart’s content – left me plastered with a smile like I’d just planted my face in a baked triple-cream brie I stole from an unsuspecting neighbour’s windowsill. (Let’s pretend that it makes sense to cool a baked brie on a windowsill like a pie for a mo’, if only to imagine the smell wafting in the air.)

Here’s the best Saturday I’ve had in some time, at a glance:

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Great Canadian Cheese Festival

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One of the brews that’ll be haunting my cup this summer, Muskoka Summerweiss.

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The people behind one of my favourite cheese producers, Cross Wind Farm (maple cream is to die for).

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I like to think of this “get away van” in the manner of the Ikea commercial: whoever owns this brought it in anticipation of all the good deals they were going to get at the cheese festival. Thus, they came running out at the end of day screeching, “Start the car! Start the caaaaaaar!”

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Best Baa’s Eweda Cru is one of my favourite local sheep’s milk cheeses. Such a unique flavour.

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My long-suffering boyfriend driving hilariously like a old lady because his back was sore. I like to think it’s more aerodynamic this way, too, though.

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Another beer on my patio wishlist: Beau’s Kissmeyer Nordic Pale Ale, a.k.a. liquid gold.

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The sweetest smile you ever did see, at Fromagerie Rang 9.

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That’s me, downing the last of my peach cider “sample.” They were generous.

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I sampled probably 70 different types of cheese, and bought 11 hunks, slices and wedges. Here are the spoils I snagged and the unrequited crushes I developed:

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Fleur Saint-Michel by La Fromagerie de Terroir de Bellechasse. This grilling cheese is made with garlic scapes, so it tastes like a morsel of garlicky grilled cheese all its own. It made my boyfriend’s eyes widen.

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Laliberté by Fromagerie du Presbytère. This was the Grand Champion of the 2015 Canadian Cheese Grand Prix. The mongers seemed surprised that the person in front of me wanted to buy the entire wheel. That’s like breakfast for a cheese freak.

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Lemon Fetish goat feta cheese by Fifth Town Artisan Cheese. It’s no accident that there are mere crumbs left in the Lemon Fetish section. This one’s a heavenly sweet-salty-tangy mix.

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Mountainoak Cheese Gold. It took the Extra Aged Gouda category at the 2015 Canadian Cheese Grand Prix. In practice, that’s a sharp, crumbly morsel that makes your mouth stand up and pay attention.

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Allegretto by Fromagerie la Vache à Maillotte. I’ve seen this one a number of times around the cheese block in Toronto, but I finally tried it in Prince Edward County. It’s another succulently-aged, dry and fruity cheese.

Other cheese nabbed, but not pictured, are:

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I also developed strong feelings for Blue Harbor’s Urban Blue Cheese. Look at that rind. This was one of the first cheeses I sampled, so I decided to do a lap and come back before buying. Foolhardy. Of course I forgot to loop back. I’ll have to track this one down for another hit of that smooth, mellow nibble with just a touch of bite.

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And of course, the Big Kahuna I couldn’t land. I fell absolutely head over heels in love with Glasgow Glen’s Pepper & Mustard Extra Old Gouda. Alas, we weren’t meant to be in PEC – the gouda was only available for online ordering. But I’ll be tracking it down. When you know, you know.

I’ll be adding profiles and more details on all of the cheeses I snapped up at the Great Canadian Cheese Festival in the coming weeks. Suffice it to say, the experience was worth the ticket price, lengthy drive and then some. I’ll be back again next year.

Did you make it out to the Great Canadian Cheese Festival? I’d love to know what you thought, and what you bought! Leave me a comment below, or tweet me @xCheeseTheDay!

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Cheesy musings

This weekend: great Canadian cheese in Prince Edward County

This weekend, Prince Edward County will host the fifth annual Great Canadian Cheese Festival, showcasing more than 150 cheeses from eight provinces across Canada, culminating in the country’s largest cheese show.

How am I just finding out about it this year?! Better late than never.

I’ll be heading up to PEC Saturday to sample all of the curds, slices and scoops on offer – I probably should have started fasting days ago to save room, but instead I’ll keep munching these chocolate almonds as a warm-up – in my first visit to the region.

PEC has become quite the hotspot: it was featured in Travel + Leisure as one of the Best Places to Travel in 2015, described as “a haven for creative types.” And because all of those creatives – or anyone craving a little more of an (brace for it) artisanal feel – need a place to stay, the Drake opened an outpost last year to capitalize on all of the Birkenstocked traffic.

If that “capitalize” sounded a little loaded with envy, peruse the photos below and let’s reconvene.

Drake-front-door1   Drake-deck  Drake-ski-ceiling-room Drake-bathroomDrake-restaurantDrake-tablesDrake-patio
Photos: Kayla Rocca/Flickr

We on the same page now? Yeah. I wanted to stay at the Drake, but as you can imagine, it books up way in advance. It’s definitely on my list, though.

Luckily, hordes of cheesemongers, cheese lovers and bad cheese punners (just me? Okay, the cheese stands alone) is more than reason enough for me to head up to the country. If you aren’t too far from PEC, it’s well worth the drive. The weather forecast says we’re due for a nice, not-too-hot, sunny day. Come say hi if you spot a tiny blonde girl bouncing around the stalls babbling about crystals, and I’ll share a curd with you.

If you have recommendations, questions or product you’d like me to hunt down while I’m at the Great Canadian Cheese Festival, tweet me @xCheeseTheDay or shoot me a comment on here, I’d love to hear from you! I’ll be posting cheesy finds, photos, interviews and more from the Great Canadian Cheese Festival over the next few days, so check back if you’re already experiencing fromage FOMO. Happy weekend!

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Cheesy musings

Canadian Cheese Grand Prix: The winners

Two out of the eight cheeses I tried won in their categories, of which I’m ridiculously proud, even though my choices were completely based on availability and nothing more. Stillll.

Matthew McConaughey

Here is the full list of winners from the Canadian Cheese Grand Prix:

  • Fresh cheese: Bella Casara Ricotta, Quality Cheese Inc., ON (one of my picks)
  • Fresh pasta filata: Cherry Bocconcini, Natural Pastures Cheese Company, BC
  • Fresh cheese with grilling properties: Le Paillasson de l’isle d’Orléans, Les Fromages de l’isle d’Orléans, QC
  • Soft cheese with bloomy rind: Comox Brie, Natural Pastures Cheese Company, BC
  • Cream-enriched soft cheese with bloomy rind: Laliberté, Fromagerie du Presbytère, QC
  • Semi-soft cheese: Fleur de Weedon, Fromagerie P’tit Plaisir, QC
  • Washed- or mixed-rind soft cheese: L’Origine de Charlevoix, Laiterie Charlevoix Inc., QC
  • Washed- or mixed-rind semi-soft cheese: Raclette, Fromagerie Fritz Kaiser Inc., QC
  • Washed- or mixed-rind firm cheese: Alfred Le Fermier 18 months, Fromagerie La Station, QC
  • Firm cheese (except cheddar and gouda): Heidi, The Farm House Natural Cheeses, BC
  • Swiss type cheese: Louis D’or, Fromagerie du Presbytère, QC
  • Mozzarella (ball, brick or cyclinder) or pasta filata: Oaxaca, Local Dairy Products, ON
  • Brine-ripened cheese: Feta Cheese, Tiras Dairies Inc., AB
  • Gouda (aged 1 to 6 months): Gouda Medium, Sylvan Star Cheese Ltd., AB
  • Aged gouda: Gouda Aged, Sylvan Star Cheese Ltd., AB
  • Extra aged gouda: Mountainoak Farmstead Premium Dutch Gold, Mountainoak Cheese Ltd., ON
  • Blue cheese: Le Bleu d’Élizabeth, Fromagerie du Presbytère, QC
  • Flavoured cheese with added non-particulate flavouring (except smoked cheese): Griffon Raclette, Fromagerie Fritz Kaiser Inc., QC
  • Smoked cheese: Gouda Smoked Natural Cheese, Sylvan Star Cheese Ltd., AB
  • Flavoured cheese with added particulate solids and flavouring: Pepper Raclette, Fromagerie Fritz Kaiser Inc., QC
  • Mild cheddar (aged 3 months): L’Ancêtre Organic Mild Cheddar, Fromagerie L’Ancêtre Inc., QC
  • Medium cheddar (aged 4 to 9 months): L’Ancêtre Organic Medium Cheddar, Fromagerie L’Ancêtre Inc., QC
  • Old cheddar (aged from 9 months to a year): Traditional Clothbound Cheddar 9 to 12 months, The Farm House Natural Cheeses, BC
  • Aged cheddar (1 to 3 years): Avonlea Clothbound Cheddar, Cows Creamery, PE
  • Aged cheddar (more than 3 years): Extra Old Cheddar 5 Years, St-Albert Cheese Cooperative Inc., ON (one of my picks!)
  • Farmhouse cheese: Handeck, Gunn’s Hill Artisan Cheese Ltd., ON
  • Organic cheese: Alfred Le Fermier 18 months, Fromagerie La Station, QC
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Cheesy musings, Profiles

Canadian Cheese Grand Prix: It’s on like Donkey Kong

That’s probably how I would open the awards if I were hosting, which is likely why they chose Ben Mulroney and Genevieve Borne instead. Totally fine, guys, wise choice.

I’ve profiled like Diddy Kong (that is, a speedy foil to the former DK) the last few days to marshal my thoughts on the nominees I was lucky enough to find and try ahead of the Canadian Cheese Grand Prix – the country’s biggest national cheese competition!

Here are the cheeses I profiled:

Le Baluchon
St-Albert’s Extra Old Cheddar
Le Mamirolle
Muenster by Bothwell
Raclette au poivre
Appletree Smoked Cheddar
Albert’s Leap Brie
Ricotta by Quality Cheese Inc.

Let’s take a moment of appreciation for the fact that Canada even has a national cheese competition. We’re becoming more internationally recognized and renowned as producers of fine ass cheese, and that warms my patriotic, cheese-lovin’ heart.

I’ll have a recap of the winners of the Canadian Cheese Grand Prix tomorrow (Eeeeeeee!), but if you, like me, can’t hardly wait, follow along with their live-blog on Twitter @100CanadianMilk!

Here’s how I’ll be enjoying the awards:

Tina Fey night cheese
Giphy

But if you want me to host next year, I’ll totally dress up and stuff. Snuggie-free.

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